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Ways to Liven Up Your Long Commute

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It’s no surprise that in many cities, traffic is getting worse— much worse. You get out of the house on time and start your commute to work only to be held up in a traffic snarl long enough to count to a ten thousand, recite all the nursery rhymes you know, write a four page essay, and memorize your to do list for the coming months. And still have time to kill.

Being stuck in traffic during your commute can be incredibly and mind-numbingly boring. It can seem as though your wasting your life away spending hours sitting in the car, and trying to configure a different route to work to hopefully avoid some traffic, while praying you get a work-from-home job as soon as possible.

According to a 2017 Traffic Index study by TomTom, a navigation company, Los Angeles is the worst gridlocked city in the U.S., followed by other congested cities such as San Francisco, New York, Seattle, San Jose, Miami, Portland, Honolulu, Washington DC, and Boston, among others.

While you may not be able to avoid the traffic, you can avoid putting yourself through a torturous commute by adding a little spice to your drive.

Try an Audiobook

While audiobooks are convenient to listen to during your commute since you don’t need your hands or eyes to listen to them, audiobooks also make for great companions when you are stuck in traffic. You can grab one that interests you from companies such as Audible, or even rent one from your local public library, and transport yourself to a more enjoyable time period, helping you escape from the tensions and frustration building up inside of you.

Listen to a Cool Podcast

There number of available, FREE podcasts on a wide range of eclectic topics that are informative, educative, interesting, and entertaining is almost too many to count. Take time during your commute to laugh, educate yourself on a topic that interests you, or get caught up in a mystery. Some podcasts that have garnered attention publicly that may be worth checking out are: Serial, Tim Ferriss Show, The Splendid Table, and TED Radio Hour.

Make Use of Technology

Use innovative sites such as iTunes to listen to new music and change up your playlist, especially if you find that you have stuck to the same playlist or radio station for a while. Use this commute as an opportunity to discover new artists! And make sure you pick music that’s upbeat and positive, rather than cathartic, to avoid any road rage incidents.

While moving away from a busy city is always an option, most people would choose to stay put, even if that means a longer commute! So take time to find an outlet that works for you. Happy cruising!

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LifeStyle

What are Your Irrational Driving Fears?

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When it comes to getting behind the wheel of a car, many drivers are buckling up with an intense amount of anxiety building inside. There’s a name for it, actually. Vehophobia is truly the fear of, or the phobia of, driving.

While this is something that likely plagued all of us as first-time drivers, it is unfortunately something that sticks with some drivers for life, ultimately steering them toward not driving at all.

Just like vehophobia can range from the phobia of driving on highways or specific routes to the fear of driving altogether, there are a variety of other fears many drivers claim to have when they’re in control of a vehicle. We’ve compiled a list of some of the most common ones below.

Dystychiphobia: Fear of Accidents

Kicking off the list is one that most drivers can likely relate to. Dystychiphobia is the scientific name for an excessive fear of accidents. While everyone on the road should have a healthy respect for auto accidents, those suffering from this phobia become obsessed with the idea that their actions will cause an accident, thus forcing them to alter life decisions and actions.

Ophidiophobia: Fear of Snakes

If you’re thinking the fear of snakes isn’t related to the driving world, think again. According to a survey completed by Jalopnik, some drivers have such an intense snake phobia, they refuse to drive over a snake in the roadway, dead or alive, for fear of it biting them. While driving over any wildlife isn’t recommended, it’s also not a great idea to swerve out of a lane and potentially cause an accident to avoid a snake. This is what many with a snake phobia are doing.

Semiochophobia: Fear of Semi-Trucks

Another common phobia found among drivers is the fear of 18-wheelers and other semi-trucks on the road. Speeding up to pass them, staying in a slower lane to avoid driving behind them, and holding your breath when around one are all signs you might have this fear, too. Even if you can remain calm, cool, and collected around one semi, doesn’t everyone feel nervous when they’re trapped by semis on all sides?

Vehicle Ekrixiphobia: Fear of Car Explosions

Have you ever been driving somewhere and began to smell something questionable coming out of the air vents? Or maybe you even begin hearing something that you haven’t heard before? If you suffer from ekrixiphobia, then you’ll immediately assume that your car is going to explode. Pulling off to the side of the road and jumping out may be your next step. While the chances of your car blowing up are pretty slim, your better course of action is to look up a GarageFly shop near you on your mobile device and head straight there.

Gephyrophobia: Fear of Bridges

While drivers living in Arizona don’t have to worry about this fear as much, many drivers have a fear of driving over bridges, especially when they’re being used to cross over a body of water. Those struggling with this phobia will search endlessly for a different route to avoid crossing the bridge, or may become frozen behind the wheel when faced with driving over one.

Can you relate to any of the phobia listed above? Or do you have your own irrational driving fear that you could add to the list? Regardless of what you may be stressed about, it’s always best to remain as calm as possible before hitting the open road.

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