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ADOT: Taking Highway Traffic Signs to the Next Level

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It may be biased to say, but when it comes to Arizona, we seem to do everything better than the rest. The Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) is no exception, and their handiwork on freeway signs throughout the Valley is proof of that.

One of the most important things to know about the Arizona traffic safety sign rules is that they are more permissive than most. And there is a reason behind that; regular traffic signs just don’t catch the driver’s attention. Without a little creativity, and in most cases, a whole lot of humor, most signs go unnoticed by those driving by.

It is because of this reason that ADOT started an exciting campaign designed to boost traffic safety. Rather than the boring “Stay safe and buckle up” phrases, they are utilizing references to many items in pop culture that are trending at the time.

If you’ve been on an Arizona freeway recently, you’ve likely seen references to Adele, Star Wars, Pokémon Go!, and even guacamole. With creativity like that, it’s safe to say that the entire experience is designed to catch the driver’s attention, as well as stress the importance of staying safe on the road, which is the goal ADOT has set out to reach. They stress that the signs are meant to be both serious and fun.

According to ADOT, the signs help reinforce the state’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan, which aims to cut down on DUIs, speeding, aggressive driving, distracted driving, failure to use seatbelts, and other bad driving behaviors.

With a few jokes and simple messages, each Arizona traffic sign will be able to save lives more efficiently. As safe as we may try to be on the road, and on the freeway specifically, it’s all too easy to get distracted. With an eye-catching sign, drivers are reminded to focus on the road, all while enjoying their commute a little more.

While ADOT has done an excellent job with the content they’ve come up with so far, they’re looking for a little help from Arizona locals. Drivers in the area can share their submissions with ADOT until February 19, and the best 15 messages will advance to the next round. In March, the public can then vote on which signs should be showcased on the road starting in April. To submit your own idea, just visit: http://azdot.gov/about/transportation-safety/safety-message-contest

Regardless of the messages picked, one thing is for certain; Arizona drivers can admire the commitment shown by ADOT for road safety, and we can all look forward to the creative signs in April!

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LifeStyleSafetyTravel

Big Changes Expected on Interstate 10

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The cities of Phoenix, Casa Grande, and Tucson make up what’s known as the ‘growing southwest megaregion’ in Arizona. Cities within a megaregion are tied together by strong links and can influence one another, even if they’re hundreds of miles apart.

For this megaregion in Arizona, Interstate 10 serves as a conduit between the cities, and is heavily trafficked by freight vehicles. Carrying everything from avocados to medical supplies, the freight traffic is both necessary and taxing on I-10.

From wear and tear of the road itself to placement of rest stops and fuel stations, all of this has begun to affect driver safety. Thanks to students at Arizona State University, University of Arizona, and Northern Arizona University, a new study is being done to plan for the future of freight traffic on the I-10 with a focus on efficiency, safety, and sustainability.

“Hopefully, in the long run, this research will help shorten commutes, save lives, create more breathable air and find a way to pay for all of it,” Michael Kuby, a professor in ASU’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, said.

This study will focus on topics such as reaping more benefits from pass-through traffic, emerging technology called connected and automated vehicles (CAVs), and identifying threats posed to transportation infrastructure by natural and man-made hazards, to name a few.

Students at the three major in-state universities aren’t the only ones taking a look at the I-10 and devising strategies to improve it. The Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG), the Federal Highway Administration (FHA), and the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) launched their own study back in 2014.

Their study focuses on the 31-mile freeway corridor beginning at the I-17/Loop 101 North Stack interchange in the north Valley and travels south and east to the Interchange I-10/Loop 202 Pecos Stack. This area has been dubbed the “Spine” because it is the transportation backbone of Maricopa County. In fact, more than 40 percent of all freeway traffic in the area travels over the Spine.

Drivers in that area have been pressing for solutions due to a high volume of accidents, closures, and gridlocks. According to Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton, “the goal is to make our most heavily traveled freeway safer and more efficient for commuters, residents, and pedestrians.”

With MAG, ADOT, and FHA completing their study, they now have recommendations including upgrading 24 of 31 traffic interchanges to widen roads and improve cross-freeway traffic, provide better technology to help communicate travel information to drivers, and improving availability and reliability for transit and carpooling, among other things.

Arizona locals are urged to give their feedback on these proposed changes, and have until February 17th to do so. Simply click here for a chance to give your feedback and have it included in the study record.

Beyond the major improvements happening on the I-10, the local universities are excited about the opportunity to be working alongside one another.

“This is the first time we have a project between all of us, and you can see relationships and partnerships develop as we work through this. It’s going to be very exciting and very fruitful as we move into the future,” Edward Smaglik, associate professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, Construction Management and Environmental Engineering at NAU said.

So whether you’re a Sun Devil, Wildcat, or Lumberjack fan, this I-10 project is something we can all be rooting for.

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SafetyTrending Automotive News

SB 1054: Arizona Collision Law Moving to Senate

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On June 17, 2016, recent Horizon High School graduate Joe Smith and three of his high school friends were driving back from a post-graduation trip to California. Upon nearing Quartzsite, Arizona on Interstate 10, the boys slowed down due to an accident, when an 18-wheeler barreled into them and another vehicle.

As a result of the impact, 18-year-old Joe was killed and the three other boys in his vehicle were seriously injured. In the other vehicle, 74-year-old Sun City resident Joseph Garcia was killed, and his wife Mary Lou was left paralyzed from the waist down.

Seven months later, and the truck driver has not been charged with any crime. As it stands currently, Arizona law does not require that drivers in deadly accidents be given a drug or alcohol test. Steve and Tana Smith, Joe’s parents, are on a mission to change that.

The Smith’s are lobbying a new bill in the Senate that would change the law in his name. SB 1054, known as “Joe’s Law” would require drug or alcohol testing for driver’s involved in crashes that cause serious injury or death.

According to records obtained from a Department of Public Safety trooper, the 42-year-old semi-truck driver seemed lethargic and tired after the accident, and when asked if he was tired, he responded “yes.” However, he was not tested for drugs or alcohol.

“If this bill passes, ‘Joe’s Law’ would help ensure that families who endure a tragedy like ours won’t have the added stress of forever wondering and never knowing if there were more factors that caused the crash, “ Tana Smith wrote in a post on Facebook.

The bill’s primary sponsor is Senator Judy Burges, and the co-sponsors are Senator Sylvia Allen, Senator David Farnsworth, Senator Steve Montenegro, and Senator Frank Pratt.

While not an official bill sponsor, Senator Lupe Contreras spoke emotionally in support of Joe’s Law. He lost his sister in a car accident when she was just 18 years old, as well.

“I know what that pain is cause here I am today and I’m able to sit up there and hopefully pass this law that will hopefully prevent another family from having to endure what we have endured for so many years,” Contreras said.

On January 26th, a Senate Panel approved SB 1054 on a 7 to 0 vote. The law will now move to the full Senate for action.

According to Joe’s dad, Steve, simply knowing whether the driver had been impaired would make the death of their son easier to manage.

“Had we known whether or not this driver was impaired, it would make this unbearable situation easier to cope with. The not knowing, because no test was done in our case, is agonizing,” Steve said.

A petition on Change.org has garnered more than 2,000 signatures in support of having the law passed, and will be delivered to Senator John McCain.

Tana believes that many individuals are unaware that the Arizona law does not require drug and alcohol testing after a deadly accident, and hopes that Joe’s Law will bring the flawed law to light, and ultimately change it.

“I’ll do whatever I can do to change this because this is something that can affect anybody at any time,” Tana said.

This will be an interesting story for the Arizona collision industry, as well as all Arizona residents, to follow in the coming months.

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Safety

Pushbutton Ignitions Not as Secure as They Seem

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These days, you’d be hard-pressed to find a new vehicle that doesn’t come with a pushbutton ignition. Gone are the days of digging through purses and briefcases to find car keys. With pushbutton ignitions, one simply needs to have their key fob on them to gain access to the vehicle, and start the engine.

As technology in the automotive industry continues to advance, cyber security has become a topic of significant concern. In late December, the pushbutton ignitions became the latest issue of security in our vehicles.

According to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB), a “mystery device” (pictured above) has been discovered that is allowing criminals to steal vehicles with pushbutton ignitions.

The device works in two stages. First, it detects the signal from the vehicle’s key fob from a distance up to 10 feet. Then, the information is transferred to a “relay box” which allows the thief to open the doors and start the vehicle’s engine.

Having acquired the device from a third-party security expert overseas, NICB teamed up with CarMax and used the device on 35 makes and models of vehicles, successfully gaining entry into 19 of them. Of those 19, they were able to start the engine and drive away in 18 vehicles, and 12 of the vehicles were even able to be restarted once the ignition was turned off. For understandable reasons, NICB is not saying what vehicle makes and models are susceptible to the device.

This “mystery device” can get around engine immobilizers, alarms, and other security devices that may be on a vehicle, meaning a criminal can climb into your car and drive it like they own it.

Without the trace of broken glass, sound of the car alarm being triggered, or evidence of an ignition key being stolen, there is no way for the vehicle owner to know that their car has been taken. This also means that NICB does not know how many vehicles have been stolen using the mystery device.

NICB President and CEO Joe Wehrle said, “The scary part is that there’s no warning or explanation for the owner. Unless someone catches the crime on a security camera, there’s no way for the owner or the police to really know what happened. Many times, they think the vehicle has been towed.”

While this mystery device seems to only work on new generation pushbutton ignition cars, the NICB say there are numerous devices that operate similarly that are being marketed to thieves. They believe that different devices work on different ignition systems and likely use different technology, putting all pushbutton vehicles at risk.

So where does this leave us? NICB spokesman Roger Morris explained that auto manufacturers must be diligent in making sure they adapt their pushbutton technology to counter these devices. However, he also noted that thieves will do the same with their technology in response.

As for vehicle owners, Morris suggests they keep valuable items out of their vehicles, keep their key fob on them at all times, and park in secure or crowded areas as often as possible.

NICB COO Jim Schweitzer was quoted saying, “The manufacturers have made tremendous strides with their technology, but now they have to adapt and develop countermeasures as threats like this surface.” Let’s hope all manufacturers hear that message loud and clear.

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SafetyTrending Automotive News

The Dangers of Drowsy Driving

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During the holiday season, we often find ourselves saying “It’s just a busy time of year.” Between holiday parties and helping kids finish up last-minute school assignments, this is most definitely true. However, if we’re being honest, we’re nearly as busy every other time of the year, too.

When our schedules become jam-packed with activities and obligations, we tend to neglect the one thing we need the most—sleep. While some may believe that needing a little extra caffeine to get through the day is the worst that can happen, a new study reveals that is not the case.

According to AAA, missing just a few hours of sleep significantly increases your chances of a fatal car accident.  In fact, exhaustion is a factor in one in five fatal crashes in the United States. With drunk driving playing a role in one in three crashes, driving while tired isn’t that far behind.

The study also found that missing just three hours of sleep quadruples your risk of a crash. And with 35 percent of adults getting less than the recommended seven hours of sleep a night, this is a significant issue.

The Center for Disease Control found that one in 25 drivers (ages 18 and older) admit to having fallen asleep at the wheel at least once in the last 30 days alone. This has become such a concern that the CDC now has a Drowsy Driving Prevention Week in November to raise awareness for the 21% of fatal crashes drowsy drivers are involved in each year.

Dr. David Yang, the executive director for the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, explained that a driver who has slept less than five hours has a crash risk comparable to someone driving drunk. While a breathalyzer can determine whether someone has had too much to drink to drive, there is no official test to determine if someone has had enough sleep to drive.

While young men, individuals with children, and those working night shifts are most at risk for drowsy driving, it is something that all of us have fallen victim to. So, what can we do?

1. Know the signs of drowsy driving.

According to the UCLA Health Sleep Center, these are the most common symptoms of drowsy driving:

  • You yawn frequently.
  • You are unable to keep your eyes open.
  • You catch yourself “nodding off” and have trouble keeping your head up.
  • Your thoughts wander and take your focus off the road.
  • You can’t remember driving the last few miles.
  • You are impatient, in a hurry, and grouchy.
  • You end up too close to cars in front of you.
  • You miss road signs or drive past your turn.
  • You drift into the other lane or onto the shoulder of the road.

2. Find a different way home.

If you experience any of the symptoms listed above, pull off to the side of the road and arrange another ride. Whether you call an Uber or Lyft, or ask a friend to come pick you up, it’s better to leave your car than to continue the drive home. If none of those options work for you, find a safe place to park your car and sleep for an hour or two. While this may be inconvenient, some drowsy driving cases land the driver in jail, so it’s better to be safe than sorry.

3. Educate yourself and others.

While drunk driving and texting while driving are getting a significant amount of attention in the media, drowsy driving isn’t talked about as much as it needs to be. Educate yourself and those around you about the dangers of driving while tired, and if possible, offer yourself as someone they can contact should they feel tired behind the wheel.

While accidents may not be totally avoidable, knowing risk factors can help decrease the number of accidents each year, and keep us all safer on the road.

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SafetyTrending Automotive News

The Connection Between Speed Limits and Car Accidents

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It’s no secret that speed limits are getting faster—much faster. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), speed limits are designed to reflect the maximum rate of speed that drivers can legally go under ideal conditions. However, when faced with traffic, construction, poor weather, or other adverse conditions, drivers should adjust their speed accordingly. Unfortunately, many drivers view the speed limit as the minimum speed, and go at least 5 MPH over the speed limit, regardless of road conditions.

A new Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) study found that increases in speed limit over two decades have cost 33,000 lives in the U.S. In 2013 alone, the speed limit increases resulted in 1,900 additional deaths, essentially canceling out the number of lives saved by frontal airbags that same year.

In 1974, a National Maximum Speed Limit (NMSL) of 55 MPH was set to conserve fuel. However, in 1987, Congress allowed states to set speed limits at 65 MPH on interstate roads in areas with fewer than 50,000 people.

Finally, in 1995, Congress repealed the NMSL, allowing states to set their own speed limits. Since then, speed limits have been on the rise.

While IIHS’s study believes that higher speed limits cause more accidents, others believe that higher speed limits simply cause more severe accidents. In fact, accidents that occur at high speeds are more often fatal. So while there is a direct connection between freeway deaths and freeway speed limits, some believe that raised speed limits do not inflate the total number of collisions.

In that school of thought, most follow studies that show drivers rarely overshoot their speed comfort zones, even if they are legally permitted. They also believe that IIHS’s study fails to take into account that the number of miles driven has gone up as the economy continues to rebound, and gas prices are low. Additionally, according to census statistics, older drivers are staying on the road longer than they once were, putting more drivers on the road.

While this all may be true, IIHS’s study cannot be ignored. With a higher maximum speed limit, individuals are going anywhere from 5-15 MPH over the limit. And the reckless driving doesn’t stop there. Self-professed speeders say they often drive 15 MPH over the limit on freeways, and also admit to passing other cars, keeping up with fast traffic, and are more likely to not wear their seat belt and to use a cell phone while driving.

In June 2015, Wisconsin switched their speed limit to 70 MPH on interstate highways. In the 12 months following that change, fatalities rose 37% on the interstate, injuries increased by 11%, and the total number of accidents rose 12%, giving merit to the study done by IIHS.

Six states in the U.S. have speed limits of 80 MPH, and in Texas, drivers can drive 85 MPH on highways. So what can be done? IIHS hopes that the outcome of their study brings to light the deadly consequences of higher speeds, and hopes states will keep this in mind when considering a speed limit increase.

For all of us, this can serve as a reminder to follow the speed limit set in place, and avoid reckless driving habits in the hopes of saving lives.

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LifeStyleSafety

Driving Sober: The Best Way to Spread Holiday Cheer

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The holiday season, specifically between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, is all about spreading holiday cheer. As the turkey is cooking, and close loved ones begin to arrive, the bottles of wine are opened, and the festive cocktails are served.

Every holiday season, organizations such as Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) stress the importance of driving sober. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that nearly 1,000 people will be injured or killed due to drunk driving between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, a rate two to three times higher than the rest of the year.

With Arizona’s ‘zero tolerance’ DUI laws, and the possibility of killing yourself or others on the road, follow these tips to stay safe this holiday season.

1. Be extra cautious the night before Thanksgiving.

Blackout Wednesday, which occurs the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, is one of the biggest drinking days of the years. With businesses closed the next day, and college kids home for break, the bars are packed. In fact, accidents from Blackout Wednesday to Black Friday account for more than 400 traffic deaths each year.

With the high volume of traffic on the road, it’s important to have a ride set up to come get you when the night ends before you have your first sip of alcohol. Whether you call a cab or appoint a designated driver in the group, this crucial step will certainly save lives.

2. Download the Uber and Lyft mobile apps.

With companies such as Uber and Lyft, there is no excuse for drunk driving. While there may be ‘surge pricing’ during the holiday season, the cost of taking an Uber or Lyft ride is significantly cheaper than a traditional cab, and definitely cheaper than a DUI ticket. Both user-friendly apps allow you to plug in your credit card information, and request a ride from your current location. You’ll know the price of your ride before you even get in the car.

3. Stay aware.

Even if you’re sober on the road, you can’t guarantee everyone else is. Take extra precautions at stop lights, waiting a few seconds after the light turns green to enter the intersection. If you notice someone driving erratically, call 911 to report the driver. Finally, make sure you’re aware of the individuals you’re at your holiday gathering with. If you notice your cousin or aunt grabbing his/her keys after a few drinks, make sure you step in for everyone’s safety.

The holidays should be a time of community, celebration, and laughter. Don’t let an unavoidable accident ruin a treasured time. Stay safe and look out for those around you to make your holiday season as merry and bright as possible!

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SafetyTrending Automotive News

The Dangers of Driving on Empty

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We’ve all done it—and probably more than once. The gas light went on the last time you drove your car, but you should be able to make it to your next destination without filling up. For some of us, it’s even a game we play. Just how far can I make it before I have to fill up?

Most of the time, we get by completely unscathed, even if we putter in to the gas station. However, if you might think running out of gas on the side of the road is the worst thing that can happen, you are surely mistaken.

When you’re cruising in your car and the gas light goes on, this means that your fuel has reached the reserve level, which is 10 to 15 percent of your tank’s total capacity. Knowing that percentage will allow you to calculate how many miles until empty you actually have. Some newer cars calculate it for you, too.

It’s crucial to avoid draining your tank and running on fumes in order to maintain vehicle health, and keep you and your passengers safe. Read more about both below:

  1. Save your fuel pump. The fuel pump in your gas tank sends the fuel from the tank to the engine. This pump relies on gas in your tank to stay cool and lubricated. Without enough gas in your tank, you run the risk of overheating your fuel pump. Once that happens, you have a much bigger problem, and an even bigger bill to pay.
  1. Save your passengers. If you run out of gas, and your engine stalls, you can become completely immobilized in the middle of the road. This greatly increases your chance of being hit, or causing a collision around you. This applies to both side streets and highways. Even if you coast onto the side of the freeway or road, some cars may not see you pull over until it’s too late to slow down.
  2. Save on your insurance bill. Calling for roadside assistance is never fun, especially when you know the problem could have been avoided. While great companies such as AAA are available to help you out, you may end up paying for it in the long run. Insurance companies take into account these call outs when your premiums are due to be renewed.

Taking time to fill up at the pump can be time consuming and cause you to go out of your way. However, taking 10 minutes at the gas station can save you a bigger headache down the road.

With gas prices at record low prices, now is the time to take advantage and save both your car and a few bucks!

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SafetyTrending Automotive News

The ‘Red Light Camera’ Debate

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According to the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety (IIHS), red light cameras are making a significant difference. Their recent study, published in July of this year, found that red light camera programs in 79 large U.S. cities saved nearly 1,300 lives through 2014.

The number of car accidents not only decreased in red light crashes, but in overall fatal intersection crashes. The belief is that drivers are more cautious around intersections when they know cameras are around.

Whether red light cameras are effective is something that some cities still aren’t convinced about. However, IIHS claims that shutting down these programs, as was done in Arizona earlier this year, increased red-light-running crashes by 30 percent.

While the solution to running red lights is highly contested, the problem is widely accepted. In 2014 alone, 709 people were killed in red-light-running crashes, and 126,000 were injured.

While having red-light cameras seems like a no-brainer for the IIHS, many cities believe the reasoning behind these cameras is less about saving lives and more about revenue for the city. For example, since 2003, the city of Chicago has brought in over $500 million from red-light camera tickets.

In March 2016, Governor Doug Ducey had red-light cameras in Arizona turned off as he believed the photo-enforcement company operating in Arizona needed to obtain a private-investigators’ license since they work with citizens’ personal information.

However, in May 2016, those cameras were turned back on as Redflex, the city’s photo-enforcement contractor, began to comply with the licensing requirements. Phoenix has red-light cameras located at the city’s most dangerous intersections based on collision data from crash reports. You can find a list of all of the cameras in Arizona online.

Other cities continue to keep the cameras turned off, or are coming up with creative ways to reduce the number of tickets issued. For example, the city of Tampa, Florida found that lengthening yellow-light times led to fewer accidents and reduced ticket revenue. At one intersection, yellow lights increased from 3.9 seconds to 4.8 seconds, which dropped citations 79 percent.

Whether we agree with the approach or not, it appears that red-light cameras are here to stay in Arizona. With a red-light camera ticket costing $165, it’s best to follow the rules of the road and avoid the ticket altogether. You’ll be saving yourself the money, and potentially saving lives, as well.

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How-ToSafety

The Keys to Success: Teaching Your Kid How to Drive

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You didn’t think it would sneak up on you as quickly as it did. There’s even a part of you that assumed he/she wouldn’t pass on the first—or even second—try. But here you find yourself, standing in the parking lot of the Motor Vehicle Department, with your kid holding their permit.

If your child is bold, they may ask you on the spot if they can drive you home.  Even for more timid teens, it won’t be long before they’re ready to get behind the wheel of the car and start practicing everything from driving on the freeway to parallel parking.

As most parents know, teaching your child how to drive is not a task to be taken lightly. But with the help of these tips and easy-to-follow steps below, you’ll be better prepared to hit the road with your teen in the driver’s seat.

Step 1: Make sure your car is in mint condition.

Between working full-time, picking your kids up from one activity to take them to the next, and still managing to find time for yourself, life is busy. While keeping your car in good condition is on the top of most people’s priority list, life sometimes gets in the way, and suddenly you’re a few weeks overdue for an oil change.

Before you assume your new position in the passenger’s seat, it’s important to find an auto repair shop near you to make sure your car is up for the challenge. Have them change your oil (if you need it), fill your tires with air, and make sure the steering wheel alignment is right on.

Need a solid recommendation? Visit www.garagefly.com to find an auto repair shop you can trust your car with. Best part? You can read reviews of their shop before you book!

Step 2: Scope out the perfect location.

Taking your child for their first drive down a busy street during rush hour probably isn’t the best way to get off on the right foot. While this is definitely what you want to work up to, it’s better to start small. Find a high school, church, or business parking lot near you and head there with your child after hours. This is the ideal place to teach them everything from maintaining speed to backing into a parking space. And, if you’re feeling super optimistic, you can even set up cones and practice some more in-depth driving skills.

Step 3: Have your kid name the car.

We know—this next step sounds totally crazy. We promise, there is a method behind our madness! Sometimes giving something a name is the best way for your student driver to start taking responsibility for it. While it may be your car, you don’t want your child to refer to it as “my mom’s car” the entire time they’re learning to drive. Even if they aren’t the owner, they need to own the responsibility of the vehicle and respect the process of learning to drive it.

Not to mention, this is a fun way to kick off the teaching/learning dynamic. Learning to drive can be stressful for everyone, so giving your car the name “Steve” or “Betty” can be a great way to ease any tension, and help your teen see the car as their own.

Step 4: Prepare for the worst.

As much as we hate to think about it, accidents happen. This is especially true when you’re dealing with a new driver. From running into a light pole when you’re first learning to park, to knocking off one of the side mirrors as your backing out of the garage, there’s a good chance your car won’t come out of this process unscathed.

Rather than stressing out when the damage has been done, go in with a plan! GarageFly partners with amazing auto body shops all over Arizona. Before letting your kid take you for a spin, visit our website and simply enter your zip code. This will bring up a list of trusted auto body shops in your neighborhood. And just like the auto repair shops, you can read reviews and even book an appointment online! This is just another way to eliminate the stress of an inexperienced driver.

Step 5: Try to relax.

We know how elementary this step seems, but it may actually be the most crucial. When your teen is learning to drive, relaxed is probably the last thing they’re feeling. Emotions ranging from excited to scared to everything in between, your driver could use a calming force in the car.

Believe us—we know how tempting is it to pump the imaginary brake or begin reaching for the wheel, but actions like that will only spook your child. Instead, take a deep breath before getting in the car, and encourage your teen that this process isn’t as scary as it seems. When they see that you’re calm and collected, they’ll start to feel themselves relax, making them better equipped to hit the road.

While teaching your kid to drive can be overwhelming, following the steps listed above will lead to a successful and rewarding experience for both you and your teen!

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